NAME

     output - output data file formats


DESCRIPTION

     This manual page describes the output formats of  the  files
     created  by the Yagi-Uda project's output program. The files
     are ASCII file, so can be analysed with any  graph  plotting
     program.


Example of a .dat File

     Below is a typical .dat file, for a  4ele  144-146MHz  beam,
     optimised for a huge (and useless) FB.

     # Driven=1 parasitic=3 total-elements=4 design=145.000MHz
     # Checked from 144.000MHz to 146.000MHz.
     f(MHz) E(deg) H(deg) R       jX   VSWR  Gain(dBi)  FB(dB) SideLobes(dB)
     144.000 54.7  71.5  44.47  -2.35  1.136  9.386     21.944     16.650
     144.500 54.0  70.1  41.34  -0.75  1.210  9.553     27.244     17.153
     145.000 53.2  68.4  37.55   1.61  1.335  9.742    103.055     17.777
     145.500 52.3  66.6  33.26   5.00  1.530  9.947     25.734     18.547
     146.000 51.3  64.6  28.77   9.63  1.832 10.149     18.919     18.919



What is what in the .dat

     The f(MHz) column is the frequency (MHz) at which  the  data
     is evaluated at.
     The E(deg) column is the approximate 3dB  E-plane  bandwidth
     calculated to the nearest 0.1 degree.
     The H(deg) column is the approximate 3dB  H-plane  bandwidth
     calculated to the nearest 0.1 degree.
     The (R) column is the input resistance in Ohms.
     The (jX) column is the  input reactance in Ohms.
     The (VSWR) column is the input VSWR, usually refered to a 50
     Ohm input, but this may be changed.
     The Gain (dBi) column is the gain at theta=90 degrees, which
     is  the forward direction of the beam. It is possible that a
     higher gain occurs at other than 90 degrees, but this is not
     taken  into  account.  The  antenna is seriously at fault if
     this occurs.
     The FB(dB) column is the front to back ratio in dB.
     The Sidelobes(dB) column is the minimum  level  in  dB  down
     from  the  peak gain of any sidelobe. This is not calculated
     unless the '-c' option is used, and then only on some optim-
     isation techniques.



Example of a .gai File

     The following is a small section of the .gai file.
     f(MHz)     theta  gain-E(dBi) G(E)-peak   phi   gain-H(dBi) G(H)-peak
     144.0000 -90.0000  -12.5584   -21.9444 -180.0000 -12.5584  -21.9444
     144.0000 -45.0000   -7.3507   -16.7367 -135.0000  -3.5971  -12.9830
     144.0000   0.0000 -999.0000 -1008.3860  -90.0000  -0.9010  -10.2870
     144.0000  45.0000    0.1848    -9.2012  -45.0000   4.0261   -5.3599
     144.0000  90.0000    9.3860     0.0000    0.0000   9.3860    0.0000
     144.0000 135.0000    0.1848    -9.2012   45.0000   4.0261   -5.3599
     144.0000 180.0000 -999.0000 -1008.3860   90.0000  -0.9010  -10.2870
     144.0000 225.0000   -7.3507   -16.7367  135.0000  -3.5971  -12.9830
     144.0000 270.0000  -12.5584   -21.9444  180.0000 -12.5584  -21.9444



What is what in the .gai

     The f(MHz) column is the frequency in MHz.
     The theta column is the angle theta, for which the next  two
     columns refer.
     The gain-E(dBi) is the gain at theta, relative to an isotro-
     pic  radiator.  This  is the E-plane gain. Hence at the peak
     (theta), this gives the peak forward gain.
     The G(E)-peak is the gain at theta,  relative  to  the  peak
     gain. Hence at the peak (theta=90 degrees), this is zero.
     The phi column  has  nothing  to  do  with  the  previous  3
     columns.  It  is  the  angle  for which the next two columns
     refer.
     The gain-H(dBi) is the gain at phi, relative to an isotropic
     radiator.  This  is  the  H-plane  gain.  Hence  at the peak
     (phi=0), this gives the peak forward gain.
     The G(H)-peak is the gain at phi, relative to the peak gain.
     Hence at the peak (phi=0 degrees), this is zero.


Example of a .up File

     The .up file list the improvements made by  optimise  to  an
     antenna  design. Starting from the original design, the file
     is appended each time a new better design is found. Here  is
     an  example,  where the final line is the performance of the
     4ele beam with the .dat file shown earlier.
         1 7.57dBi,  16.93dB F/B, Z=(31.77-56.34j) Ohms, VSWR=3.95, SL=16.95 dB
        84 7.58dBi,  16.93dB F/B, Z=(31.78-56.32j) Ohms, VSWR=3.95, SL=16.95 dB
       623 7.58dBi,  16.93dB F/B, Z=(31.78-56.28j) Ohms, VSWR=3.95, SL=16.95 dB
     89345 9.74dBi, 103.06dB F/B, Z=(37.55 +1.61j) Ohms, VSWR=1.33, SL=17.78 dB



What is what in the .up

     The first column is an integer specifying the iteration. The
     other  columns,  going from left to right are gain(dBi), FB,
     input impedance, VSWR and  level  of  the  most  significant
     sidelobe, in dB down on the peak gain.



SEE ALS0

     yagi(1),  output(1),  input(1),  optimise(1),  first(1)  and
     yagi(5).



AUTHORS

     Dr. David Kirkby G8WRB (david.kirkby@onetel.net), with  help
     with   converting   to   DOS   from   Dr.   Joe   Mack  NA3T
     (mack@fcrfv2.ncifcrf.gov).



















































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